Programmes / Prix en art autochtone / Lauréats

Nadia Myre

Nadia Myre

“My multi-disciplinary practice has been inspired by participant involvement as well as recurring themes of longing and loss, identity and language.”

My practice combines beadwork, stitch-work, photography, video, performance, and collaborative processes as a strategy for engaging in conversations about identity, resilience and politics of belonging. From collectively beading over the 56 pages of the Indian Act with more than 250 participants – replacing the words of the law with strings of red and white seed beads, to The Scar Project in which over 1400 people sewed their emotional, physical, or spiritual scars onto canvas, my multi-disciplinary practice has been inspired by participant involvement as well as recurring themes of longing and loss, identity and language. In Meditations on Red (2013) I fabricated handmade stitched beadwork which was scanned to create a series of 5 photographic prints. Meditations addresses the assimilationist polices inherent within the Indian Act, a document which defines and governs blood quantum of Aboriginal people. Similarly, in A Study of Ownership, Use, and Territory in Relation to Article 19 of the Indian Act: Surrendered Lots 1, 2, 3 and 4 (2009), I use red and white seed beads to delineate the coerced surrendering of lands by the Algonquins to colonists in the town Maniwaki, Québec. Foremost I am a maker. In addressing power relations inherent between the Canadian government and First Nations communities across Canada, such as contested histories and social/political struggles, I strive to translate my, and other Indigenous peoples experiences, into works that are meaningful, symbolic, and empowering.

Nadia Myre is an Anishinabe artist living in Montreal, Quebec.

www.nadiamyre.net