Programmes / Prix en art autochtone / Lauréats

Tasha Hubbard

Tasha Hubbard

“I am currently working on a feature documentary that looks at four 60s Scoop siblings recovering a sense of family that was denied to them.”

My film and media work comes from my own desire to reconnect to my Cree family and history, as I was part of the 60s and 70s Scoop. My films reflect issues that I grapple with or that fascinate me and all are inspired by my Indigenous community. I did Two Worlds Colliding because the Starlight tours happened in my city and directly affected people I knew. I made 7 Minutes, a short independent film about a young woman who is part of the “almost missing” because a man followed her home from the library and tried to put her in his van. These are issues that directly affect Indigenous peoples in Canada. But I also make work that reflects my interest in regeneration and resurgence of Indigenous culture. This is where my buffalo work is especially relevant. My independent film Buffalo Calling is about one particular herd’s survival in the face of near-extinction and diaspora. My next buffalo film focuses on Indigenous peoples’ contemporary efforts to repair our bond with the buffalo, one that was damaged after colonization. I am currently working on a feature documentary that looks at four 60s Scoop siblings recovering a sense of family that was denied to them. I am also writing an independent drama about a Cree family who decides to hide their children during the residential school era.

I like to push myself to make different types of films: investigative, experimental, dramatic, observational, and finally, with the new buffalo project, personal point of view. I took a hiatus from filmmaking to pursue a graduate degree but I am now once again immersed in making films.

Tasha Hubbard is a filmmaker from Peepeekisis Cree Nation living in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.

www.nfb.ca/two_worlds_colliding